CVE-2017-11882 has been attackers’ favorite malware delivery mechanism throughout the second and third quarters of 2019.

Delivery Vector

Delivery Vector

Delivery Vector- The third quarter of 2019 brought the rise of keylogger Agent Tesla, the decline of phishing-delivered ransomware-as-a-service (RaaS), and attackers’ continued preference for exploiting the CVE-2017-11882 Microsoft Office vulnerablity to deliver phishing campaigns.

Emotet began to surge toward the end of last quarter, according to Cofense’s Q3 2019 Malware Trends Report, the latest report in a series of phishing updates throughout the year. Summer lulls are not uncommon for cybercriminals, says threat intelligence manager Mollie MacDougall, as attackers and targets take more holidays. Emotet’s summer break contributed to the quiet.

It wasn’t completely silent on the phishing front. Researchers saw a shift from mostly information stealers in the second quarter, to keyloggers, namely Agent Tesla, in the third. The change doesn’t necessarily reflect a broader shift to keyloggers; nor does it relate to a specific campaign. The unconfirmed likelihood, MacDougall says, is Agent Tesla was “cracked,” enabling unpaid access to the service and increasing its popularity. Paid users of the keylogger can access an easy-to-use Web interface and customer support via Discord, enabling simpler propagation.

“Threat actors presumably saw an opportunity to leverage a cheap solution that does not require much effort for decent profit, namely in the form of credentials or sensitive information,” she adds.

Throughout the second and third quarters, researchers saw little change in the significant delivery mechanisms used to spread malware. The most common method, as seen in more than 600 incidents, is Microsoft Office vulnerability CVE-2017-11882, which remains a “prolific technique” for attackers to spread malware through phishing attacks, researchers report.

The memory corruption vulnerability, now patched, had existed for 17 years before a fix was released in Nov. 2017. This remote code execution bug exists in Microsoft Office when the software fails to properly handle objects in memory. It’s exploited using Office attachments, which may range from Excel spreadsheet, to Word docs, to RTF files. When a victim clicks a malicious document, the exploit is triggered and usually downloads a “stage two” malware.

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Article Credit: Dark Reading

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